Welcome to KARRYON’s Mythbusters, a randomly-run series, during which we use a pin to poke holes in balloons of preconceived ideas on tourist destinations and sites.

Previously, we revealed the truth about San Diego’s size and Anaheim’s Disney-only reputation.

CLICK HERE for more of KARRYON’s Mythbusters.

Today, we look at the South Pacific and the notion that the region’s historical sites are better appreciated by the older generation.

Err, WRONG!

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While they may not be filled with adventurous activities (unless you’re diving to underwater sites), these places go beyond the old school thinking of quiet burial grounds surrounded by statues and little else.

Like for example, there’s the Malietoa Memorial in Samoa – a significant historical landmark located in the backyard of a seaside resort that separates itself from other historical locations by acting as commemoration to peace, not war.

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For those who don’t know, the ancient site of Malietoa Memorial marked the end of centuries of conflict between Samoa and Tonga, and the end of Tonga’s 300-year forceful rule over Samoa.

1250 years later and site continues to have great importance as a reminder of the lasting respect between Samoa and Tonga, while also acting as a beautiful and tranquil location for tourists.

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It’s located right by the ocean, so it comes with a gorgeous view of Samoa’s big blue sea, and it doesn’t feature hordes of people usually associated with historical sites, as it sits in the backyard of a high-end property called ‘Le Vasa Resort‘.

This rare and exclusive location allows guests to take peaceful strolls through sacred ground without interruption and at their leisure.

Even sweeter is that staff at the hotel are always happy to showcase the Malietoa Memorial, and share tales and legends of the land.

Sounds like an interesting experience for all.

READ: MYTHBUSTER – don’t underestimate San Diego, it’s bigger than you think

READ:  MYTHBUSTER – there’s more to Anaheim than just Disneyland

What’s the most powerful historical trip you’ve taken?