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Pay to play: Bali to apply new tourist tax on all visitors from next week 

Australians travelling to Bali will need to put a little extra cash aside from next week, with the Bali Provincial Government announcing it will apply a new tourist tax of 150,000 Indonesian rupiah (around AU$15) effective 14 February.

Australians travelling to Bali will need to put a little extra cash aside from next week, with the Bali Provincial Government announcing it will apply a new tourist tax of 150,000 Indonesian rupiah (around AU$15) effective 14 February.

The new levy, which will apply to all foreign visitors to the popular island destination, will be in addition to the current e-visa on arrival or the visa on arrival. 

According to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s (DFAT) Smartraveller website, “cashless payments can be made online prior to travel or on arrival at designated payment counters at Bali’s airport and seaport”.

For further information, travellers should refer to the Bali Provincial Government’s official website.

Travel warning

Denpasar Airport Bali
Denpasar Airport

The new tax kicks in on the same day Indonesians head to the polls to vote for the next President.

Earlier this week, DFAT issued a new travel alert for Australians about to head to Bali due to possible disruptions caused by the Indonesian Presidential election, which happens on 14 February. 

“Frequent political rallies and possible protests are likely to occur in the lead-up to the election,” the Department warns in its latest travel advice released today. 

“Expect traffic delays and restricted access to locations if protests occur. Avoid protests and demonstrations and monitor local media for the latest updates.”

A Balinese beach
A Balinese beach

It also says that protests and events are often held near major government buildings and embassies in capital city Jakarta, as well as “any of Australia’s Consulates-General in Surabaya, Bali and Makassar, at government buildings, or the offices of international organisations in Indonesia”. 

DFAT recommends visitors “phone or email ahead for an appointment before going to the Embassy or the Consulates-General”.

Additionally, it advises Australians to plan their activities to avoid potential unrest on significant dates and to be prepared to change their travel plans.

Western tourist couple on Bali mountain with camera stick.
Hiking in the province

The current advice for travellers is to “exercise a high degree of caution in Indonesia overall due to security risks”, so the government does not recommend Australians reconsider their need to travel to the country or Bali. 

Indonesia officially ended visa-free travel to Bali for all but ASEAN nations in 2023.

Last week, the latest new service from Australia to Denpasar was launched, from Canberra to Denpasar flying Batik Air.