Avalon waterways
Home Travel Industry News

Hurtigruten on a natural high: All ships fully operational, bookings higher than 2019

From Alaska to Galapagos, from Antarctica to the Norwegian coast, Hurtigruten Group is reporting that all its ships will once again be fully operational as of 1 June 2022 (the first time since March 2020) and bookings are accelerating past 2019 levels.

From Alaska to Galapagos, from Antarctica to the Norwegian coast, Hurtigruten Group is reporting that all its ships will once again be fully operational as of 1 June 2022 (the first time since March 2020) and bookings are accelerating past 2019 levels.

The Norwegian Group also said that the fleet will be sailing with no capacity restrictions, with forward bookings for the 12-month period from second quarter 2022 to the first quarter 2023 also higher compared to pre-pandemic levels.

Hurtigruten Group CEO, Daniel Skjeldam, said that while the first quarter of 2022 was still heavily affected by the pandemic, countries in the Group’s key source markets and destinations have moved markedly closer to normality.

“We have already made significant progress this year, with all our ships in Hurtigruten Norway back in operation, and Hurtigruten Expeditions’ MS Roald Amundsen, and MS Fram also successfully completing an Antarctica season.”

Hurtigruten CEO Daniel Skjeldam
Hurtigruten CEO Daniel Skjeldam.

He added, “As of May we are ahead of our pre-Covid-19 ticket sales for the coming quarters. From 1 June, all Hurtigruten Expeditions ships across the globe can finally offer unique adventures to our travellers without many restrictions.”

All restrictions on Hurtigruten Norway’s capacity were lifted in February this year, with a steady uptick in activity throughout the first quarter. Hurtigruten Expeditions also ended the quarter with all but two of its ships sailing, and Hurtigruten Svalbard set a new turnover record in March.

The Galapagos has recently been launched as Hurtigruten Expeditions’ newest adventure destination, and Hurtigruten Group has continued to develop its HQ2 in London.

Skjeldam forecasts a robust second quarter, noting, “The outlook for the second quarter and beyond is very positive, considering everything we’ve been through over in recent years.”

Hurtigruten
Brown Bluff, Antarctica

“This is mostly due to the resilience of our employees and engagement from our guests, who love our experiences. Although we’ve been tested, we are emerging from the pandemic in a strong position, with new investments and our eyes firmly fixed on the future.”

Hurtigruten Group has also continued to consolidate its position as an industry leader in Environmental and Social Governance (ESG), with its annual ESG report released last month detailing the many milestones achieved by the cruise ship company in 2021, as well as its key targets and objectives going forward.

In March Hurtigruten Norway announced the launch of Sea Zero, its partnership with leading research Norwegian-based organization, SINTEF, to develop the world’s first emission-free ships.

At this stage, Hurtigruten says it is looking to sail its first emission-free Hurtigruten Norwegian Coastal Express ship by 2030, an important step in the Group’s overarching strategy to become a zero-emission adventure travel company by 2050.

In the interim, Hurtigruten Norway has also initiated one of Europe’s largest environmental ship upgrades, to be completed in 2023.

While there is no doubting that leading the cruise industry on sustainability and social responsibility is key to strengthening Hurtigruten Group’s competitive position globally, a belief in the importance of doing the right thing is the Group’s primary motivation.

Says Skjeldam, “There’s no time to spare when it comes to building a sustainable, responsible, and exciting adventure travel industry for tomorrow – and that is our number one job today.”

For more, head to www.hurtigruten.com.au