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The 'truly horrific' Marble Arch Mound closed and ready for destruction

London's Marble Arch Mound saw the longest queues it had ever seen this weekend with locals and travellers dashing to experience it before its controversial closure.

London’s Marble Arch Mound saw the longest queues it had ever seen this weekend with locals and travellers dashing to experience it before its controversial closure.

The Marble Arch Mound, which opened, charged emission, closed, and then reopened for free was finally closed for good this weekend after just six months of existence.

The Mound, which stood 25m tall and came with a £6m price tag, promised lush vegetation, mature trees and thick greenery from an elevated platform on a prime position, on the corner of London’s Hyde Park and Oxford Street.

However, when it opened on 26 July, visitors reported unhealthy-looking trees, sad plants and a general sense of neglect.

Does it remind you of something?

Disco Dong
Byron Bay’s not-so-lovingly-named ‘Disco Dong’

Anyway, back to London.

Dubbed by locals as ‘London’s worst attraction’, the Marble Arch Mound was designed to tempt people back to the West End as lockdown restrictions eased in mid-2021.

Visitors could climb to the top of the Mound and swoon over dreamy views of the capital’s Oxford Street, Hyde Park, Mayfair, and Marylebone.

However, the attraction didn’t live up to expectations, being described as ‘miserable’, ‘underwhelming’ and ‘Truly horrific. In every aspect.’

Despite the controversy around the Mound, once the news of its closure became known, many flocked to pay tribute, with reports that Saturday was packed full of people wanting to say goodbye for themselves.

Two young lovers of the Mound have even started a petition to save the landmark from destruction.

Apparently, the Mound is both a piece of art and a piece of community and it must not be cut down in its prime especially in light of the money and joy already invested into it.

However, only 157 have signed to save it, so we’re not holding our breath.

The Mound is due to be deconstructed, which is set to take up to four months, with the trees and plants finding new homes in hopefully more publically loved spaces.

How do you feel about the Mound? Let us know, email editor@karryon.com.au.