Queenstown takeover
Queenstown takeover

5 Reasons to consider teaching English abroad

Teaching abroad is not only a way to further your horizons but it can help your sovereign to boot!

Teaching abroad is not only a way to further your horizons but it can help your sovereign to boot!

Minister for Education, Christopher Pyne, took to the podium this week at the Australian Studies Centre, Peking University in Beijing China to discuss the relationship between China and Australia forged on mutual cooperation, a strong trading partnership and a symbiosis built on education.

“And of course China is in our region and our time zone, which makes doing business with them so much easier,” he said in his speech during his inaugural visit to the centre.

According to the Minister for Education, the research exchange that took place five decades ago set the scene for a continuous exchange of students and information.

China is by far our largest source of international students. It has been collaborating in research and education since 1963.

Now almost 3,500 Australian students study in China and some 120,000 Chinese students study in Australia each year.

However, education isn’t the only relationship holding strong between the two trading partners.

Many Aussies have taken to packing their bags after their bachelors degree and heading to China to teach English.

Moreover, it isn’t just China these language savants are headed to. Hundreds seek the old world culture of Europe, the spicy flavour of South America and the warmth of Africa.

They, according to Study Abroad have more than a healthy bank balance to show for it.

That is why it is important to know the five potential benefits of  teaching English abroad.

We are almost certain that Hon. Christopher Pyne would approve.

teaching-abroad-karryon

We’re sure Hon. Christopher Pyne would approve.

 1.Opportunities are ripe for the picking

Over a billion people around the world take up English lessons. This means that the market is strong enough to accommodate many a university graduate.

2. Expand your horizons

Those that return after a year or two from teaching abroad wax lyrical on the benefits of living in a different country and experiencing another culture. Short holidays are great but if you want to get into the thick of an experience, time is your only ally.

3. Adding it to the resume

With what’s referred to as “globalisation” bringing states closer, particularly in the technology and business sectors, many companies are seeking out candidates that can handle the stresses and joys of living abroad.

4. Learn another language

Anyone that has left university will agree that life is an endless quest for knowledge and languages are an asset to be cherished. There is no better way to really learn to speak another language fluently than by interacting with it on its proverbial “home turf.”

5. Fund your fun

It’s obvious that holidays know how to burn a hole in your bank account. If they didn’t, we’d be on them constantly. However, by picking up a teaching job, you are funding your travel abroad without having to deal with the financial hangover when you get back.

teaching-abroad-karryon

Image Source: ucsuvolunteering.files.wordpress.com

On top of these reasons is the one mentioned in the teaser: helping your sovereign.

An influx of those willing to head overseas to share their knowledge of English to others only helps to further our strong bond with our favoured trading partners.

In this light, teaching abroad is the educational equivalent of “taking one for the team.”

Have you ever taught English abroad?