G'day! Welcome to Little Australia in New York City

The next time you’re in the Big Apple, head over to the Nolita district in Manhattan, take a walk along Mott and Mulberry Street, and odds are you’ll be able to order a flat white and a smashed avo.

The next time you’re in the Big Apple, head over to the Nolita district in Manhattan, take a walk along Mott and Mulberry Street, and odds are you’ll be able to order a flat white and a smashed avo.

That’s because you’ll no longer be in New York City per se, but actually in ‘Little Australia’ – a six-by-six block just north of Little Italy and mainly concentrated on Mull and Mulberry Streets.

Earlier in this week, we sat down with the Director of Coffee at Kave Espresso Bar in Bushwick, Brooklyn, which is just one of the many NYC cafes getting onboard the Aussie coffee culture train and embracing the flat white.

Source: www. pinterest.com

Source: www. pinterest.com

But in Little Australia, Australian-owned cafes are popping up all over the place (such as Two Hands), joining other Australian-owned businesses (such as nightclubs and art galleries) as part of a growing green and gold contingent in NYC.

Indeed, walking in this neighbourhood, the odds of your hearing a fellow Aussie ordering a coffee or just kicking back and chatting are high – very high – so much so that if you’re keen to meet other Aussies whilst taking your own bite out of the Big Apple, then this is the place to throw that Australian accent around like it’s going out of fashion!

Source: www.nytimes.com

Source: www.nytimes.com

Speaking of fashion, boutique stores and clothing shops have been colonising this part of New York City in recent years too, with notable Aussie labels such as Zimmermann, Ksubi,, Mambo, and even Driza-Bone finding a home amongst their American rivals.

And judging by the area’s blossoming retail fashion scene, Americans are loving Australian designers!

Little Australia is just one of about a billion ‘micro-neighbourhoods’ in New York City, a metropolis that’s basically a microcosm of the whole world.

Source: www.news.com

Source: www.news.com

It’s a cliché that Australians love to travel. But according to long-term resident, Frank Ford, there was a time in New York City when hearing an Aussie accent on the streets was rare indeed.

But that’s no longer the case, especially since Aussies now have access to a special E-3 visa category which grants about 10,000 of these special visas each year for Australians keen on advancing their careers in the USA.

And as long as Aussies keep going after their dreams in the United States – specifically in New York – Little Australia is set to grow even bigger!

Have you paid a visit to Little Australia in New York City? Let us know what you thought of it in the comments below.