Just as there are words to describe emotions in other languages that have no English equivalent, there are a bunch of micro emotions that are only ever experienced by travel agents.

These nuanced emotional states are hard to define, but my guess is that if you’ve ever worked as a travel agent for any spell of time, you’ll recognise them right away.

So let’s delve into the rich emotional tapestry of the travel agent right now, and focus on five of the more common ones.

Have you felt these before?

 

1. Froishten (froy-sh-ten)

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Briefly defined, this is the feeling you get when you know your client has been shopping around behind your back, despite their claims of loyalty. The word encapsulates the frustration you may feel at having them lie to your face, and you may find your fists clenching in response.

 

2. Cmonn (ca-mon)

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The frustration you feel when your GDS freezes, and you really need it to work like RIGHT NOW. This emotion occupies the sweet spot between anxiety, anticipation and anger.

 

3. Arcinghel (ark-ing-hell)

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What you feel when a customer keeps changing their mind on what they want, despite confirming it all just a few days ago. This emotion is part irritation, part contempt and part rage, and it’s usually settled by a visit to the pub.

 

4. Schudastaiedom (shuda-stayd-hom)

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Usually felt after a night of heavy drinking, this emotional state is defined by not having the energy or drive to put on the travel agent hat. In fact, when you feel this way, talking about holidays and travelling – two things you otherwise LOVE chatting about – is the last thing you want to do. A nice long sleep is often the cure to this emotional affliction.

 

5. Zeintagz! (zayn-tagz)

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A feeling of immense panic and horror after you’ve realised you’ve misquoted a client in Gal and will now go into a serious NEG. Unfortunately, this is the type of emotion that can ruin your day, or week, or even month. It’s best said in a German accent, and best represented with an exclamation at the end to drive home its emotional intensity.

Have you ever felt these emotions before? Have you felt any others you’d like to share?