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Lie-Flat In Economy For $360? Yes Please And Thank You, Lufthansa

Say goodbye to being squashed up against the window for hours on end and say hello to a three or four-row economy bed, thanks to new Lufthansa trials.

Say goodbye to being squashed up against the window for hours on end and say hello to a three or four-row economy bed, thanks to new Lufthansa trials.

European airline, Lufthansa, is trialling a surprisingly affordable new option to give long-haul economy passengers the chance to get a taste of the business class experience and get some rest before touching down in their new destination.

The new seating option, called Sleeper’s Row, is being trialled on their Boeing 747-8 planes between Frankfurt and Sao Paulo, with the possibility of it being rolled out across the airline’s entire long-haul fleet.

Expected to be priced at just $360, Sleeper’s Row is an affordable way to guarantee personal space and sleep. Two things that are high up on most travellers’ flying wish list.

It sounds dreamy, tell me more…

Lufthansa Sleepers Row

Okay, so you might have to BYO PJs, but the new concept does include some extra perks with your private seat row. The airline will provide a mattress, pillow and blanket to ensure you get super snug and cosy.

Passengers in ‘Sleeper’s Row’ will also get to board earlier than other economy passengers, to make sure the bed is set up and ready to catch some zzz’s.

Think of it as glamping, in the sky. Skamping? That works… right?

The future of flying

Earlier this year we were introduced to the Economy Skynest by Air New Zealand.

The Skynest, which provides six full-length lie-flat sleep pods, is the result of three years of Air New Zealand research and development, with the input of more than 200 customers at its Hangar 22 innovation centre in Auckland.

Zephyr Aerospace is also working on cool new futurist designs airline’s in the wake of COVID-19.

These new designs could create double-decker seating in a 2-4-2 configuration which, designer Jeffrey O’Neill says, would allow the majority of global airlines to maintain the same seating density as offered by their existing premium economy cabins.

What new direction would you like to see airlines heading towards?